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  1. #1
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    Apparenty No One Is

    Don't Worry If You're Not Having Sex—Apparently, No One Is

    A new study claims that young people are having a lot less sex than previous generations — and honestly, no one is really sure why
    By Dan Roe September 21 2017





    If it feels like you’re having less sex these days, don’t worry — it’s not just you who’s going through a dry spell. An overwhelming amount of new research suggests that
    young people just aren’t hooking up the way they used to. They’re also waiting longer to have sex, drinking less, and acting like 15-year-olds even after they’ve hit the big 18.

    According to millennial researcher Jean Twenge, lead author of a new study just published in Child Development, the shift is due to a variety of factors including more parental involvement and a longer life expectancy, which allows young people to act like teens for far longer than those who were born before 1994.

    And there’s more: according to Macquarie Research, a firm that conducted financial research for Church & Dwight, the conglomerate that owns Trojan Condoms, condom sales are dropping, which means fewer people are having (safe) sex — and, apparently, Generation Y’s over-reliance on technology is to blame.

    "Young people (17-25 years old) are having less sex because they are distracted by their mobile phones," Macquarie Research wrote in a statement released last Thursday.

    To be fair, this isn’t the first time that someone has argued that millennials are too distracted by technology to have sex. A 2016 study in Archives of Sexual Behavior polled 26,707 U.S. adults of all ages and found that nearly 15% of millennials hadn’t had sex since age 18, compared to 6% of Generation X members who fell in that category. Media reports on the study linked millennials’ decreasing interest in sexto a generational obsession with technology. Another recent study found that teens are more into video gamesthan humping like jackrabbits.

    But even if millennials are not exactly the Tinder-fueled hookup generation their parents feared, is this thesis actually true? Are millennials having less sex — and if so, is technology the actual reason?
    Part of it might have to do with how shallow the dating game has gotten.

    Twenge, for instance, told the Washington Post that using popular dating apps “ends up putting a lot of importance on physical appearance, and that, I think, is leaving out a large section of the population.

    There are other possible reasons why millennials are less sexually active. According to Macquarie Research's analysis, many millennials are living at home, and it's harder to get it going with your parents snoring mere feet away. Additionally, the issue might not be that millennials are having less sex, but that they’re buying fewer condoms simply because they’re increasingly using other, riskier birth control methods, like pulling out.But even if millennials are having less sex, is that going to spell the end of times for the human race?

    P
    robably not.
    Twenge’s research finds that although the average baby boomer had 11 sexual partners versus Gen Y’s average of eight, members of the Greatest generation (1901 to 1924) had an average of just three sexual partners. Perhaps our declining number of sexual partners just means we’re paying homage to our ancestors. But, hey, if you're feeling like your sex life could use a little bit of a kick, you can check spice it up with the 30 best sex toys or these tips, which will take your bedroom game to the next level.

  2. #2
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  4. #3
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    Sucks to be a millennial

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  6. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by PinkPearls View Post
    I am not surprised, I have witnessed how they do not know how to communicate with out the texting while in the same room with the opposite sex. It really is tragic but they are so attached to their electronics.
    Better than rubies

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  8. #5
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    Texting

    This technology is older than you think. The concept was first explored in 1984, and the first text was sent in 1992.



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  10. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by PinkPearls View Post
    Texting

    This technology is older than you think. The concept was first explored in 1984, and the first text was sent in 1992.


    True but most of those who are addicted and understand the technology are the younger people. I myself do not have time for all of that texting, skyping, face chat etc.
    I have seen some of my older friends get caught up in the tech world and every last one of them busted themselves by sending info to the wrong people and then they realized it was not for them.
    I had a manicurist who was a few years younger than me and she was totally addicted to facebook, she started having neck problems and she lost alot of sleep because she could not put her phone down.
    Technology has allowed so many people to appear to be
    dumb,
    rude,
    ignorant
    and lazy.
    Better than rubies

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  12. #7
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    {QUOTE=Proverb31;154186]

    True but most of those who are addicted and understand the technology are the younger people. I myself do not have time for all of that texting, skyping, face chat etc.
    I have seen some of my older friends get caught up in the tech world and every last one of them busted themselves by sending info to the wrong people and then they realized it was not for them.
    I had a manicurist who was a few years younger than me and she was totally addicted to facebook, she started having neck problems and she lost alot of sleep because she could not put her phone down.
    Technology has allowed so many people to appear to be
    dumb,
    rude,
    ignorant
    and lazy.
    [/QUOTE]



    yeah, make sure it's not a group text sent out. I prefer talking on the phone myself so texting is usually brief. It all comes in handy since I really only face time with my nieces and the baby. They're the ones I first started texting with lol.

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  14. #8
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    Why Mixing Middle-Aged Dating And Sexting Is A Terrible Idea

    By Michelle Martin

    02/15/2015 08:31 am ET Updated Apr 17, 2015




    So I have a question for everyone who is middle-aged, single and dating. Just when was it that sexting after the first date became the new normal? At what point in our cultural evolution did it become normative practice to send a text the night after a first date, with the words “nipple” and “naked” in it? I’d really like to know the answer to this question. I am just burning with curiosity as to how this new dating ritual became mainstream so quickly.
    I’d really like to know what middle-aged person was actually the first one to say “Hey, I think this is a really good idea. I mean, we’ve already shared a few glasses of wine and an appetizer, so why not indulge in some dirty sex talk with a naked photo chaser exchanged on our smart phones via an insecure wireless transport?” And then once all these middle-aged men and women who are engaging in the practice of early-courtship-sexting answer me, I’d like to say this in response: “Stop it! Stop it right now! All of you! I mean it! Stop it!”

    When I first re-entered the dating world a little over a year ago after taking a few decade hiatus to raise my son, I expected to update my “rules for the dating road” handbook. But what I didn’t expect was for so many of my dates to turn a seemingly harmless morning-after-the-first-date texting banter session into a graphic sexual encounter. Yet at least twice this month alone I had really nice dates with seemingly nice mainstream, professional men that quickly went south when initially cutesie, fun, and banter-y texting rapidly evolved into full-blown erotica before the second date!

    In fact, I’m certain that a few dates didn’t lead to second ones because I didn’t indulge. And by “didn’t indulge” I don’t mean that I cursed at these men, called them pigs, and threatened to call their mothers. No, what I did was to respond with an innocuous “LOL” and perhaps a wink emoticon, and then gently changed the subject.

    I must admit that on one occasion I almost succumbed. I really liked this man and wanted to see him again, so I actually pondered complying with his request for a wet t-shirt selfie a few days after our first date. But what tempted me to almost jump off the sexting bridge weren’t solely his good looks, charm and allure; rather, it was his assertion that I was “soooo conservative,” and that I was the “only woman” he’d met who didn’t immediately indulge in a frenzied sexting męlée after the first date. So yes, this 54-year old woman who has been dating for upwards of 40 years, and who has multiple advanced degrees, and writes about self-esteem and the importance of standing firm, almost leapt on the sexting bandwagon because of peer pressure. Yep, for just a moment I thought “uh oh, am I really the only one? Really??“

    Here’s the issue I have with sexting - actually, there are several. First, it’s never a good idea to have naughty self-authored stories and naked photos of oneself floating around in cyberspace where anyone from the NSA to our bosses, to our neighbors and maybe even our kids can find them. And if you don’t think that’s a realistic concern, think again. When was the last time you checked to see if your photo stream was on? I for one am constantly toggling this smart phone feature for one reason or another, which means that many photos on my iPhone could at any time pop up on any of my other devices, scarring any number of people, potentially for life.

    Also, this 50-year old-plus body is not what it used to be, despite a pretty rigorous yoga regimen. I have cellulite, and the thought of having naked photos of me posted on some revenge porn website with untoned arms and orange-peel thighs is horrifying, simply horrifying. In fact, this fear alone is enough to keep me in check. And no, taking photos of myself with my head cut out of the picture won’t help, because I’m assuming that if I know a man well enough to sext him (which according to contemporary dating guidelines means between 24 - 48 hours), then he will potentially have my contact information in his phone, so even if I’ve heeded the red danger lights flashing inside my head and snap the shot from the neck down, my full name will still be boldly announced at the top of the screen for all the world to see.

    Now some of you (men) might be thinking “what about a little naughty talk? What’s wrong with that?” Well, beyond the sheer awkwardness of entering into sext talk with a man I’ve set eyes on only once or twice, I’m simply a terrible storyteller. I know this may seem like an odd and rather surprising admission coming from a writer, but I write non-fiction, not fantasy, not romance, and certainly not erotica. On the one or two very rare occasions when I have attempted to cross the line from flirty banter to fantasy talk, I have failed miserably. I got nervous, and my mind went blank, which then turned into a nasty case of writer’s block and the absolute most I could muster was an occasional “uh huh” or, “I guess so...alrighty then.” Not really very sexy at all.

    So going back to my original admonition, stop it — all of you middle-aged, first-date sexters, just stop it. You’re putting too much pressure on the rest of us out there who find no value and far too much risk in sexting, particularly after only one date. It’s confusing enough out there with all the new rules ushered in with the era of online dating, and for many of us, we’re still trying to catch up.

    Now, I know that everyone has to make their own decision about this new trend in middle-aged dating, but with all new ventures involving a certain measure of risk, before jumping off the cliff, it’s a really good idea to imagine the absolute worst case scenario and then ask yourself if you’re okay with the outcomes. So stop what you’re doing right now, and imagine yourself in the scenarios listed below:

    1. You’re in a dating relationship that goes awry and your date starts harassing you. You decide to file a police report against him and the officer tells you that you must print off all of your texting history and bring it in to be added to the file. Boom! You’re now the neighborhood police department porn star!

    2. You leave your photo stream on and your son, daughter, mother, father, aunt, uncle, boss, neighbor or Apple genius bar guy grab your iPad to check on something. Boom! You’re now the family, workplace or local Apple Store porn star!

    3. Your very trustworthy date (you know, the man you met last night) gets his phone stolen. Boom! You’re now a national porn star!

    How do these scenarios make you feel? Can you manage these risks? Do you even want to? And what are the benefits of sexting to you? Do these benefits outweigh the potential risks? If not, then my advice to you is stop it. All of you middle-aged, first-date sexters, stop it!

  15. #9
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    Middle-Aged Worse at Texting-While-Driving, Study Shows
    But, experts stress that distracted driving is dangerous at any age

    Please note: This article was published more than one year ago. The facts and conclusions presented may have since changed and may no longer be accurate. And "More information" links may no longer work. Questions about personal health should always be referred to a physician or other health care professional.




    By Alan Mozes

    HealthDay Reporter

    TUESDAY, Dec. 30, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The risky mix of texting and driving may be more problematic for middle-aged drivers than it is for younger drivers, according to new research.

    However, that doesn't mean texting and driving is OK for any age group, the study authors stressed.

    "First and foremost we don't want to misrepresent this in any way that promotes texting and driving among young drivers," said study co-author Randall Commissaris, an associate professor in the department of pharmaceutical sciences at Wayne State University in Detroit. "But today more and more older people are texting, not just teens and those in their 20s and 30s. And a lot of these older people are doing it while driving," he added.

    "So we systematically road-tested a range of drivers, from age 18 to 59," Commissaris explained. "And we found that while about 25 percent of the youngest drivers would go into an oncoming lane or onto the shoulder while texting, it was virtually 100 percent among the oldest drivers."

    Results of the study are published in the January issue of Accident Analysis and Prevention.

    To explore how texting affected drivers of different ages, the researchers ran 50 men and women through a series of computerized road tests.

    Texting ability varied, according to the study. Seven described their texting ability as limited -- meaning they had to search for the keys and typed with one finger. Sixteen said their texting skills were good, though they described using two hands to text. Twenty-seven volunteers were in the "skilled" texter category, meaning they're able to handle sending texts with one hand, according to the study.

    The researchers divided the volunteers into four age categories: 18 to 24; 25 to 34; 35 to 44; and 45 to 59. To test their driving skills, they were asked to "drive" a four-door fully outfitted driving simulator that created a virtual, but realistic, roadway experience. The driving simulator mimicked driving on a two-lane country road. There were no stop signs or stop lights. And, there were no oncoming cars in the opposite lane, the study reported.

    Each volunteer drove for a half-hour test session. During that test, they were asked to drive several minutes at roughly 50 to 60 miles per hour while engaging in brief text conversations conducted with one hand.
    Overall, two-thirds of drivers committed "lane excursions," meaning they crossed into another lane with oncoming traffic or on to a shoulder, according to the study. Among skilled texters, about half of the volunteers committed lane excursions.
    But digging deeper, investigators found that nearly all of those in the 45 to 59 group made such driving mistakes.

    This compared with about one-quarter of those between the ages of 18 and 24, according to the study. About 40 percent of those 25 to 34, and 80 percent of drivers between 35 and 44 made lane excursions, suggesting that the ability to handle the texting distraction got continually worse with age.

    The researchers found no differences in driving and texting ability between genders.
    Exactly why older drivers fared worse remains unclear, although the research team suggested that older drivers may simply spend more time looking at their phones, or may be generally less able to multitask.

    "The findings were very surprising to us," said Commissaris, "because most of the literature on distracted driving suggests that mature drivers are better able to manage distractions. Whether it's being involved in a cellphone conversation, talking with passengers, or checking maps."
    But, he added, "this study suggests that we really need to make sure that older drivers don't take the attitude that they're somehow better able to manage this particular distraction. They're not."
    Commissaris framed the findings as a good basis for considering a New Year's resolution: "a personal ban on texting and driving. Because the reality is that the text you're sending isn't all that important, particularly if that text ends up as part of an auto crash."

    Kara Macek, director of communications for the Governors Highway Safety Association (GHSA) in Washington, D.C., agreed. "Texting while driving is always a bad idea, whether you're 60 or 16," she said.

    "A lot of the current anti-texting-while-driving messaging is aimed at teens and young drivers," she said. "That's still an important segment to target, but this study reinforces the need to reach out to older drivers, too. It's alarming to find that their driving skills may be impacted more severely, particularly because they are just as guilty of the behavior as their younger counterparts."

    Macek stressed the GHSA's message for all drivers: "put your phone away and focus on the road."

    More information

    For more on distracted driving, go to the U.S. National Highway Traffic Safety Administration.


    SOURCES: Randall L. Commissaris, Ph.D., associate professor, department of pharmaceutical sciences, Eugene Applebaum College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, Wayne State University, Detroit; Kara Macek, director of communications and spokesperson, Governors Highway Safety Association, Washington, D.C.; January 2015, Accident Analysis and Prevention

    Last Updated: Dec 30, 2014

  16. #10
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    Guess, contrary to what Ms Badu say, she Can't make him put his phone down.

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  18. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by PinkPearls View Post
    Don't Worry If You're Not Having Sex—Apparently, No One Is

    A new study claims that young people are having a lot less sex than previous generations — and honestly, no one is really sure why
    By Dan Roe September 21 2017





    If it feels like you’re having less sex these days, don’t worry — it’s not just you who’s going through a dry spell. An overwhelming amount of new research suggests that
    young people just arenÂ’t hooking up the way they used to. TheyÂ’re also waiting longer to have sex, drinking less, and acting like 15-year-olds even after theyÂ’ve hit the big 18.

    According to millennial researcher Jean Twenge, lead author of a new study just published in Child Development, the shift is due to a variety of factors including more parental involvement and a longer life expectancy, which allows young people to act like teens for far longer than those who were born before 1994.

    And there’s more: according to Macquarie Research, a firm that conducted financial research for Church & Dwight, the conglomerate that owns Trojan Condoms, condom sales are dropping, which means fewer people are having (safe) sex — and, apparently, Generation Y’s over-reliance on technology is to blame.

    "Young people (17-25 years old) are having less sex because they are distracted by their mobile phones," Macquarie Research wrote in a statement released last Thursday.

    To be fair, this isnÂ’t the first time that someone has argued that millennials are too distracted by technology to have sex. A 2016 study in Archives of Sexual Behavior polled 26,707 U.S. adults of all ages and found that nearly 15% of millennials hadnÂ’t had sex since age 18, compared to 6% of Generation X members who fell in that category. Media reports on the study linked millennialsÂ’ decreasing interest in sexto a generational obsession with technology. Another recent study found that teens are more into video gamesthan humping like jackrabbits.

    But even if millennials are not exactly the Tinder-fueled hookup generation their parents feared, is this thesis actually true? Are millennials having less sex — and if so, is technology the actual reason?
    Part of it might have to do with how shallow the dating game has gotten.

    Twenge, for instance, told the Washington Post that using popular dating apps “ends up putting a lot of importance on physical appearance, and that, I think, is leaving out a large section of the population.

    ”
    There are other possible reasons why millennials are less sexually active. According to Macquarie Research's analysis, many millennials are living at home, and it's harder to get it going with your parents snoring mere feet away. Additionally, the issue might not be that millennials are having less sex, but that theyÂ’re buying fewer condoms simply because theyÂ’re increasingly using other, riskier birth control methods, like pulling out.But even if millennials are having less sex, is that going to spell the end of times for the human race?

    P
    robably not.
    TwengeÂ’s research finds that although the average baby boomer had 11 sexual partners versus Gen YÂ’s average of eight, members of the Greatest generation (1901 to 1924) had an average of just three sexual partners. Perhaps our declining number of sexual partners just means weÂ’re paying homage to our ancestors. But, hey, if you're feeling like your sex life could use a little bit of a kick, you can check spice it up with the 30 best sex toys or these tips, which will take your bedroom game to the next level.
    They might be(dare I say)-
    Smarter than us, when it comes to sex???
    They've seen the errors (in) being out there hitting everything, in sight
    especially out there- "RAW".
    .
    .
    They've seen the heartache & headache of out of wedlock kids.
    They're very familiar w/the acrimony & ALIMONY that follows having these kids.
    .
    .
    SO, after figuring in all the other components(already discussed here)
    perhaps we should give them 'credit' for learning from OUR mistakes?

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