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  1. #166
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    Travel back to Augusta, Georgia in 1929:

    A group of farm workers singing the spiritual, "Mary, Don't You Weep."

    click


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  3. #167
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    THE FIRST MASSIVE AFRICAN AMERICAN PROTEST IN U.S. HISTORY WAS LED BY CHILDREN MARCHING AGAINST LYNCHING IN THE SILENT PROTEST PARADE




    First Massive African American Protest in American History (July 28, 1917) were children in New York City participating in the Silent Protest Parade against the East St. Louis Riots. Between 8,000 and 10,000 African-Americans marched against lynching and

    anti-black violence in a protest. The march was precipitated by the East St. Louis Riot of May and July of that year, which was an outbreak of labor and race-related violence that caused up to 200 deaths and extensive property damage. The Parade was

    organized by famous civil rights activist and first African-American to earn a doctorate (from Harvard University) W. E. B. Du Bois and the NAACP. The protesters hoped to influence President Woodrow Wilson to carry through on his election promises to

    African-American voters to implement anti-lynching legislation and to promote black cases; to the great horror of civil rights activists across the country, Wilson repudiated his promises, and federal discrimination actually increased during his presidency. It

    was the first parade of its kind in New York and the second public civil rights demonstration of African-Americans.

    The paraders assembled at Fifty-ninth Street and Fifth Avenue and marched thirty-six blocks downtown to Madison Square Park.* They were led by about 800 children, some no older than six, dressed entirely in white.* Following the children were white-clad women,

    then rows of men dressed in black.* The marchers walked wordlessly to the sound of muffled drumbeats.* Despite their silence, their concerns were articulated on neatly* stenciled banners and signs.

    The banners and signs read: “MOTHER, DO LYNCHERS GO TO HEAVEN?; “GIVE ME A CHANCE TO LIVE”; “TREAT US SO THAT WE MAY LOVE OUR COUNTRY”; “MR. PRESIDENT, WHY NOT MAKE AMERICA SAFE FOR DEMOCRACY?; AND “YOUR HANDS ARE FULL OF BLOOD.”

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  5. #168
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    click on it.

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  7. #169
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    5 Inventions by Enslaved Black Men Blocked By US Patent.




    click on it

  8. #170
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    @Sultry


    The Peoples Grocery was a grocery located just outside Memphis in a neighborhood called the "Curve".[1] Opened in 1889, the Grocery was a cooperative venture run along corporate lines and owned by eleven prominent blacks, including postman Thomas Moss, a friend of Ida B. Wells.[2] In March 1892 Thomas Moss and two of his workers, Will Stewart and Calvin McDowell, were lynched by a white mob while in police custody.[3]



    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peoples_Grocery

    http://wreg.com/2017/03/09/peoples-g...wreath-laying/


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  10. #171
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lord_nikon View Post
    @Sultry


    The Peoples Grocery was a grocery located just outside Memphis in a neighborhood called the "Curve".[1] Opened in 1889, the Grocery was a cooperative venture run along corporate lines and owned by eleven prominent blacks, including postman Thomas Moss, a friend of Ida B. Wells.[2] In March 1892 Thomas Moss and two of his workers, Will Stewart and Calvin McDowell, were lynched by a white mob while in police custody.[3]



    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peoples_Grocery

    http://wreg.com/2017/03/09/peoples-g...wreath-laying/
    I heard about this anniversary on the news the other day.

    "On March 9,1892, a mob of masked men dragged the three from the Shelby County Jail and lynched them near a brick and train yard in the present day Uptown area." Smh

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  12. #172
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    Quote Originally Posted by PinkPearls View Post
    This University Is The First HBCU To Win CheerSport Nationals



    According to WJCL News, SSU’s Tigers Cheerleading Squad weren’t the first cheerleading team to bring this award to Savannah State, they made history as the first Historically Black College and University to ever accomplish such an achievement.

    "We have a lot of great members on this squad and a great program," Morgan Moore, SSU Sr. Cheerleader, told the reporter. "We just wanted to make sure to better it, improve it and make it the best we can, it's just a great achievement for our squad and our school."

    "We're all very proud," Dathan Gooden, SSU Sr. Cheerleader, admitted. "We wanted to bring this home because no one ever really saw us accomplish anything like that before or really know what we're about, so just wanted to bring it home."

    Congratulations to the Savannah State Tigers Cheerleading Squad on not only being the first HBCU to accomplish such a feat but for making history and memories to last a lifetime.



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  14. #173
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  16. #174
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    Quote Originally Posted by PinkPearls View Post
    Thank you. This was remarkable.

  17. #175
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    SELMA BURKE



    Selma Hortense Burke was born in Mooresville, North Carolina, one of ten children of Neal Burke, a local Methodist minister and Mary Jackson Burke. She received her formal educational training from Winston Salem University and later graduated in 1924 as a registered nurse from St. Agnes Training School for Nurses in Raleigh, North Carolina. After graduating she moved to New York City, New York where she worked as a private nurse.

    While in New York, Burke began to focus on her artistic creations. Through a second brief marriage to Claude McKay, she became associated with the Harlem Renaissance. Working in Harlem for the Works Progress Administration and the Harlem Artists Guild, Burke began teaching art appreciation and education to New York youth. During the 1930s, she traveled across Europe studying and honing her skills as an artist under Aristide Maillol of Paris, France and Povolney of Vienna, Austria. In 1940 she opened the Selma Burke School of Sculpture in New York City and the following year graduated with a Master of Fine Arts degree from Columbia University. In 1942 she joined the Navy making her one of the first African American women to enroll. While in the Navy, Burke was commissioned to do a bronze relief portrait of President Franklin Delano Roosevelt. The portrait she created was adapted by the mint and is currently on United States dimes. - See more at: http://www.blackpast.org/aah/burke-s....sSlryMwi.dpuf

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  19. #176
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    ONEY JUDGE

    Ona Judge, George and Martha Washington’s runaway slave, risked it all to escape the nation’s capital and reach freedom. Erica Armstrong Dunbar reveals it all in Ona Judge's harrowing history, NEVER CAUGHT.



    http://www.philly.com/philly/living/...ve_escape.html

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  21. #177
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  23. #178
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sultry View Post
    Sad but true.

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  25. #179
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  27. #180
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sultry View Post
    Amen.

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