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  1. #196
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    This 1792 famous painting shows ship captain John Kimber whipping a female slave for refusing to eat. The woman died and John was tried for murder. However, he was found innocent. But that would feed fuel for the abolitionist movement led by William Wilberforce.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by the moor; 01-31-2018 at 07:27 PM.

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  3. #197
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    Here is the 2000 version of the slave woman in the John Kimber post. I decided to put it here, instead of the Exotic Lounge forum, because it is telling history. The title of the picture is "Punishment."

    punishment.jpg
    Last edited by the moor; 01-31-2018 at 04:30 PM.

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  5. #198
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    The First Boat.

    debunking more revisionist American his-story.


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  7. #199
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    Quote Originally Posted by Maint_Man View Post
    The First Boat.

    debunking more revisionist American his-story.

    The Africans were not slaves. They were treated as indentured servants. Anthony Johnson, one of those Africans, served out his indenture and became a land owner who had white and black as indenture servants. Note: indentured servants were treated no better than slaves. They suffered the same faith, (beatings, many ran away, etc. ) as slaves.

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  9. #200
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    Callen, Maude Daniel [1898-1990]. Nurse. Born in Florida, Callen was educated at Florida A&M College and the Tuskegee Institute. In 1923, now a registered nurse, she arrived in Berkeley County as a missionary of the Episcopal Church. She was often the sole health-care provider, teacher, and nutritionist for the remote and scattered population of a 400 square mile area.

    She is best remembered for her work as a nurse mid-wife, delivering more than one thousands babies and providing pre-natal and post-natal care for mothers.

    In the 1940s she was instrumental in the establishment of a Midwife Training Institute at Penn Center to train and license midwives. Maude Daniel Callen's work and generosity were recognized with an honorary degree from Clemson University and induction into the South Carolina Hall of Fame.
    http://southcarolinapublicradio.org/...niel-1898-1990

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  11. #201
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  13. #202
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    Inoculation was introduced to America by a slave.

    Few details are known about the birth of Onesimus, but it is assumed he was born in Africa in the late seventeenth century before eventually landing in Boston. One of a thousand people of African descent living in the Massachusetts colony, Onesimus was a gift to the Puritan church minister Cotton Mather from his congregation in 1706.

    Onesimus told Mather about the centuries old tradition of inoculation practiced in Africa. By extracting the material from an infected person and scratching it into the skin of an uninfected person, you could deliberately introduce smallpox to the healthy individual making them immune. Considered extremely dangerous at the time, Cotton Mather convinced Dr. Zabdiel Boylston to experiment with the procedure when a smallpox epidemic hit Boston in 1721 and over 240 people were inoculated. Opposed politically, religiously and medically in the United States and abroad, public reaction to the experiment put Mather and Boylston’s lives in danger despite records indicating that only 2% of patients requesting inoculation died compared to the 15% of people not inoculated who contracted smallpox.

    Onesimus’ traditional African practice was used to inoculate American soldiers during the Revolutionary War and introduced the concept of inoculation to the United States.




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  15. #203
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    The earliest recorded protest against slavery was by the Quakers in 1688.

    Quakers, also known as “The Society of Friends,” have a long history of abolition. But it was four Pennsylvania Friends from Germantown who wrote the initial protest in the 17th century. They saw the slave trade as a grave injustice against their fellow man and used the Golden Rule to argue against such inhumane treatment; regardless of skin color, “we should do unto others as we would have done onto ourselves.” In their protest they stated, "Pray, what thing in the world can be done worse towards us, then if men should robb or steal us away, & sell us for slaves to strange Countries, separating housband from their wife and children….”

    Their protest against slavery and human trafficking was presented at a “Monthly Meeting at Dublin” in Philadelphia. The Dublin Monthly Meeting reviewed the protest but sent it to the Quarterly Meeting, feeling it to be too serious an issue for their own meeting to decide. The four Friends continued their efforts and presented at the Philadelphia Yearly Meeting, but it wasn’t until 88 years later that the Society of Friends officially denounced slavery.

    Over the centuries, this rare document has been considered lost twice. Most recently it was rediscovered in 2005 and is now at Haverford College Special Collections.




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  17. #204
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    Of the 12.5 million Africans shipped to the New World during the Transatlantic Slave Trade, fewer than 388,000 arrived in the United States.

    In the late 15th century, the advancement of seafaring technologies created a new Atlantic that would change the world forever. As ships began connecting West Africa with Europe and the Americas, new fortunes were sought and native populations were decimated. With the native labor force dwindling and demand for plantation and mining labor growing, the transatlantic slave trade began.

    The Transatlantic Slave Trade was underway from 1500-1866, shipping more than 12 million African slaves across the world. Of those slaves, only 10.7 million survived the dreaded Middle Passage. Over 400 years, the majority of slaves (4.9 million) found their way to Brazil where they suffered incredibly high mortality rates due to terrible working conditions. Brazil was also the last country to ban slavery in 1888.

    By the time the United States became involved in the slave trade, it had been underway for two hundred years. The majority of its 388,000 slaves arrived between 1700 and 1866, representing a much smaller percentage than most Americans realize.




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